Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

‘Set up to Fail’? How Welfare Conditionality Undermines Citizenship for Vulnerable Groups

  • Aaron Reeves (a1) and Rachel Loopstra (a2)
Abstract

Underpinned by the assumption that unemployed persons are passive recipients of social security, recent welfare reforms have increased benefit conditionality in the UK and introduced harsher penalties for failure to meet these conditions. Yet, conditionality may result in vulnerable groups disproportionately experiencing disentitlement from benefits, one of the rights of social citizenship, because they are, in some cases, less able to meet these conditions. Rising sanctions, then, may be the product of a disconnection between welfare conditionality and the capabilities of vulnerable claimants. To test this hypothesis, we evaluate whether sanctions are higher in areas where there are more vulnerable Jobseeker's Allowance claimants, namely, lone parents, ethnic minorities and those with disabilities. We find that sanction rates are higher in local authorities where more claimants are lone parents or live with a disability, and that this relationship has strengthened since the welfare reforms were introduced under the Conservative-led coalition. Failure to meet conditions of benefit receipt may disproportionately affect vulnerable groups.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      ‘Set up to Fail’? How Welfare Conditionality Undermines Citizenship for Vulnerable Groups
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      ‘Set up to Fail’? How Welfare Conditionality Undermines Citizenship for Vulnerable Groups
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      ‘Set up to Fail’? How Welfare Conditionality Undermines Citizenship for Vulnerable Groups
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

M. Adler (2016) ‘A new Leviathan: benefit sanctions in the twenty first century’, Journal of Law and Society, 43, 195–27.

C. Beatty and S. Fothergill (2013) ‘Disability benefits in the UK: an issue of health or jobs?’, in D. Houston and C. Lindsay (eds.), Disability Benefits and Employment Policy: Fit for Work, Fit for Purpose? London: Palgrave Macmillan.

D. Edmiston (2014) ‘Social security privatisation: a means to whose end?People Place and Policy, 8, 2, 113–28.

R. Loopstra , A. Reeves , D. Taylor-Robinson , B. Barr , M. McKee and D. Stuckler (2015b) ‘Austerity, sanctions, and the rise of food banks in the UK’, British Medical Journal, 350, h1775. doi:10.1136/bmj.h1775.

R. Patrick and D. Fenney (2015) ‘Disabled people, conditionality, and civic minimum in Britain: reflections from qualitative research’, in C. Grover and L. Piggott (eds.), Disabled People, Work, and Welfare: Is Employment Really the Answer? Bristol: Policy Press, 2542.

N. Rose , P. O'Malley and M. Valverde (2006) ‘Governmentality’, Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 2, 83104.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Social Policy and Society
  • ISSN: 1474-7464
  • EISSN: 1475-3073
  • URL: /core/journals/social-policy-and-society
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Type Description Title
WORD
Supplementary Materials

Reeves and Loopstra supplementary material
Reeves and Loopstra supplementary material 1

 Word (305 KB)
305 KB

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 27
Total number of PDF views: 172 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 552 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 10th January 2017 - 28th July 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.