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Three Shortcomings of the Social Investment Perspective

  • Bea Cantillon (a1) and Wim Van Lancker (a2)

Abstract

In this article we critically assess the social investment perspective that has become the dominant paradigm in European social policymaking. We identify and discuss some of its shortcomings that may hamper social progress for all. In doing so, we focus on three pillars central to the idea of social investment: social inclusion through work, individual responsibility and human capital investment. We find that the social investment perspective has some serious flaws when it comes to the social protection of vulnerable groups. This is strongly related to the continuing relevance of social class in explaining and remedying social inequalities. We conclude that investment cannot be the only rationale for welfare state intervention and that protecting people should remain equally high on the policy agenda.

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References

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Three Shortcomings of the Social Investment Perspective

  • Bea Cantillon (a1) and Wim Van Lancker (a2)

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