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Psychiatry beyond the current paradigm

  • Pat Bracken (a1), Philip Thomas (a2), Sami Timimi (a3), Eia Asen (a4), Graham Behr (a5), Carl Beuster (a6), Seth Bhunnoo (a7), Ivor Browne (a8), Navjyoat Chhina (a9), Duncan Double (a10), Simon Downer (a11), Chris Evans (a12), Suman Fernando (a13), Malcolm R. Garland (a14), William Hopkins (a15), Rhodri Huws (a16), Bob Johnson (a17), Brian Martindale (a18), Hugh Middleton (a19), Daniel Moldavsky (a20), Joanna Moncrieff (a21), Simon Mullins (a22), Julia Nelki (a23), Matteo Pizzo (a24), James Rodger (a25), Marcellino Smyth (a26), Derek Summerfield (a27), Jeremy Wallace (a28) and David Yeomans (a29)...

Summary

A series of editorials in this Journal have argued that psychiatry is in the midst of a crisis. The various solutions proposed would all involve a strengthening of psychiatry's identity as essentially ‘applied neuroscience’. Although not discounting the importance of the brain sciences and psychopharmacology, we argue that psychiatry needs to move beyond the dominance of the current, technological paradigm. This would be more in keeping with the evidence about how positive outcomes are achieved and could also serve to foster more meaningful collaboration with the growing service user movement.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Pat Bracken, MD, MRCPsych, PhD, Centre for Mental Health Care and Recovery, Bantry General Hospital, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland. Email: Pat.Bracken@hse.ie

Footnotes

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See editorial, pp. 421-422, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Psychiatry beyond the current paradigm

  • Pat Bracken (a1), Philip Thomas (a2), Sami Timimi (a3), Eia Asen (a4), Graham Behr (a5), Carl Beuster (a6), Seth Bhunnoo (a7), Ivor Browne (a8), Navjyoat Chhina (a9), Duncan Double (a10), Simon Downer (a11), Chris Evans (a12), Suman Fernando (a13), Malcolm R. Garland (a14), William Hopkins (a15), Rhodri Huws (a16), Bob Johnson (a17), Brian Martindale (a18), Hugh Middleton (a19), Daniel Moldavsky (a20), Joanna Moncrieff (a21), Simon Mullins (a22), Julia Nelki (a23), Matteo Pizzo (a24), James Rodger (a25), Marcellino Smyth (a26), Derek Summerfield (a27), Jeremy Wallace (a28) and David Yeomans (a29)...

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