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Written information on bipolar affective disorder: the patients' perspective

  • Daniel C. White (a1), Sofia Laureano Schelten (a1), Brendan D. Kelly (a1) and Patricia Casey (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

The mental health information available to people with bipolar affective disorder is variable in quality. We conducted a qualitative survey in an urban out-patient department to elicit the opinions of people with bipolar affective disorder on the written information provided by three health information providers.

Results

Participants' responses were generally positive for each leaflet. The two leaflets rated highest by participants used quality assurance tools. However, 20-30% had difficulty understanding the leaflets. Medical jargon and verbosity were common criticisms.

Clinical implications

Professional bodies such as the Royal College of Psychiatrists play an important role in providing patients with written information. Quality assurance standards should be used in the production of patient information. A tool measuring individuals' appraisal of information may ensure information is appropriate to their requirements.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Patricia Casey (profcasey@esatclear.ie)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

A grant was provided by Janssen-Cilag to reimburse individuals for their participation in the study. P.C. is editor of The Psychiatrist.

Footnotes
References
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1 Prinjha, S, Chapple, A, Herxheimer, A, McPherson, A. Many people with epilepsy want to know more: a qualitative study. Fam Pract 2005; 22: 435–41.
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4 Ashraff, S, Malawa, G, Dolan, T, Khanduja, V. Prospective randomised controlled trial on the role of patient information leaflets in obtaining informed consent. ANZ J Surg 2006; 76: 139–41.
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9 Fallowfield, LJ, Hall, A, Maguire, GP, Baum, M. Psychological outcomes of different treatment policies in women with early breast cancer outside a clinical trial. BMJ 1990; 301: 575–80.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Written information on bipolar affective disorder: the patients' perspective

  • Daniel C. White (a1), Sofia Laureano Schelten (a1), Brendan D. Kelly (a1) and Patricia Casey (a1)
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