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ILLICIT INSCRIPTIONS: REFRAMING FORGERY IN ELIZABETH GASKELL'S RUTH

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 April 2005

Sara A. Malton
Affiliation:
Cornell University

Extract

Forgery is now considered an offence of the greatest magnitude;… In proportion, therefore, as a nation increases in wealth by buying and selling, it will magnify the criminality of a fraud by which buying and selling may be checked. The change of opinion will show itself in the penal laws, and in the not less deterrent force of social reprobation.

—Luke Owen Pike, History of Crime in England (1876)

Type
EDITORS' TOPIC: VICTORIAN TAXONOMIES
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press

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ILLICIT INSCRIPTIONS: REFRAMING FORGERY IN ELIZABETH GASKELL'S RUTH
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