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Settler Colonialism

  • Melissa Free
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Notes

1. Ireland was an unusual case. It was not only proximate to but also became part of the United Kingdom in 1801.

2. Kirk-Greene, A. H. M., “The Thin White Line: The Size of the British Colonial Service in Africa,” African Affairs 79, no. 314 (1980): 2544.

3. Estimates vary greatly, but it is safe to say that between five and six million Britons emigrated from Britain between 1837 and 1901, of which approximately one-third went to Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa.

4. Mar, Tracey Banivanua and Edmonds, Penelope, “Introduction: Making Space in Settler Colonies,” in Making Settler Colonial Space: Perspectives on Race, Place, and Identity, ed. Mar, and Edmonds, (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), 6.

5. Most notably in South Africa, where the European-descended Boers predated the first British settlers by more than a century and a half.

6. Patrick Wolfe, “FSI-Humanities Center International Visitor Spotlight: Patrick Wolfe,” interview by Camryn Douglass, Stanford Humanities Center, http://shc.stanford.edu/multimedia/fsi-humanities-center-international-visitor-spotlight-patrick-wolfe.

7. Mar and Edmonds, “Introduction,” 3. As Mar and Edmonds note, essays on settler colonialism and genocide can be found in Moses, A. Dirk and Stone, Dan, eds., Colonialism and Genocide (New York: Routledge, 2006) and the Journal of Genocide Research 10, no. 4 (2008).

8. See Morgan, Cecilia Louise, Building Better Britains? Settler Societies within the British Empire, 1783–1920 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2017), xxiv.

9. Coombes, Annie E., “Introduction,” in Rethinking Settler Colonialism: History and Memory in Australia, Canada, Aotearoa New Zealand, and South Africa, ed. Coombes, (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006), 2.

10. Foley, Tadhg, “‘An Unknown and Feeble Body’: How Settler Colonialism Was Theorized in the Nineteenth Century,” in Studies in Settler Colonialism: Politics, Identity and Culture, ed. Bateman, Fiona and Pilkington, Lionel (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 1011.

11. Quotation is from Said, Edward W., Culture and Imperialism (New York: Vintage-Random, 1994), 9; Foley, “An Unknown,” 15.

12. Said, Culture and Imperialism, 9.

13. Veracini, Lorenzo, “Introduction: Settler Colonialism as a Distinct Mode of Domination,” in The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism, ed. Cavanagh, Edward and Veracini, (London: Routledge, 2016), 4.

14. Said, Edward W., Orientalism (New York: Vintage-Random, 1978).

15. Stasiulis, Daiva and Yuval-Davis, Nira, eds., Unsettling Settler Societies: Articulations of Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Class (London: Sage, 1995); Wolfe, Patrick, Settler Colonialism and the Transformation of Anthropology: The Politics and Poetics of an Ethnographic Event (London: Cassell, 1999), 163.

16. Belich, James, Replenishing the Earth: The Settler Revolution and the Rise of the Anglo-World (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009); Darwin, John, The Empire Project: The Rise and Fall of the British World-System, 1830–1970 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009); Piesse, Jude, British Settler Emigration in Print, 1832–1877 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016); Wagner, Tamara S., Victorian Narratives of Failed Emigration: Settlers, Returnees, and Nineteenth-Century Literature in English (New York: Routledge, 2016); Wagner, Tamara S., ed., Victorian Settler Narratives: Emigrants, Cosmopolitans, and Returnees in Nineteenth-Century Literature (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2011); Bateman and Pilkington, eds., Studies in Settler Colonialism.

17. Paisley, Fiona, “Introduction: White Settler Colonialisms and the Colonial Turn: An Australian Perspective,” special issue, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History 4, no. 3 (2003), doi:10.1353/cch.2004.0008.

18. The “Settler Colonialism” bars represent work that deals with the subject broadly. When a work focuses on two or three colonies, I have included it in the count for each. “Bibliography of Articles and Books Published on Colonialism and Imperialism in 2000,” compiled by Fultz, Marcella, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History 2, no. 2 (2001), http://muse.jhu.edu/article/603762; “Bibliography,” compiled by Fultz, Marcella, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History 10, no. 2 (2009), doi:10.1353/cch.0.0074; “Bibliography of Books, Chapters and Journal Articles on Colonialism and Imperialism Published in English in 2016,” compiled by Fultz, Marcella, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History 18, no. 2 (2017), doi:10.1353/cch.2017.0025.

19. van Duinen, Jared, “The Borderlands of the British World,” Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History 15, no. 1 (2014), doi:10.1353/cch.2014.0008.

20. van Duinen, “The Borderlands of the British World.” To date, there have been six published print collections of “British World” scholarship. The first was Bridge, Carl and Fedorowich, Kent, eds., The British World: Diaspora, Culture, and Identity (London: Frank Cass, 2003) and the most recent was Fedorowich, Kent and Thompson, Andrew S., eds., Empire, Migration, and Identity in the British World (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013). Work in the new imperial history is exemplified by Burton, Antoinette, ed., After the Imperial Turn: Thinking with and through the Nation (Durham: Duke University Press, 2003). See also Howe, Stephen, ed., The New Imperial Histories Reader (New York: Routledge, 2010).

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Victorian Literature and Culture
  • ISSN: 1060-1503
  • EISSN: 1470-1553
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