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Control of Selected Perennial Weeds with Glyphosate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Mark H. Yonce
Affiliation:
Dep. Hortic. Sci., North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
Walter A. Skroch
Affiliation:
Dep. Hortic. Sci., North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7609

Abstract

The efficacy of glyphosate as affected by rate, time of application, and addition of surfactant3 was evaluated on blackberry, Japanese honeysuckle, poison ivy, sericea lespedeza, and trumpetcreeper. The addition of surfactant (0.5% v/v) to glyphosate had no effect on the control of the weeds studied. Glyphosate applied in mid-June to September at 1.1 or 2.2 kg/ha controlled blackberry. Mid-August glyphosate applications of 2.2 kg/ha controlled 83% of actively growing Japanese honeysuckle; there was less than 75% at one site due to moisture stress. Use of 2.2 kg/ha of glyphosate from mid-June through mid-August controlled 87% of poison ivy. Consistent commercially acceptable control of sericea lespedeza was obtained when glyphosate was applied at 1.1 or 2.2 kg/ha at the time of flowering. Applying glyphosate at 1.1 or 2.2 kg/ha from late July through early October controlled 50% or more of the trumpetcreeper.

Type
Weed Control and Herbicide Technology
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

Literature Cited

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