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Cropping Systems to Control Winter Annual Grasses in Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Oleg Daugovish*
Affiliation:
Panhandle Research and Extension Center, 4502 Avenue I, Scottsbluff, NE 69361-4939
Drew J. Lyon
Affiliation:
Panhandle Research and Extension Center, 4502 Avenue I, Scottsbluff, NE 69361-4939
David D. Baltensperger
Affiliation:
Panhandle Research and Extension Center, 4502 Avenue I, Scottsbluff, NE 69361-4939
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: agro139@unlvm.unl.edu.

Abstract

Field studies were conducted from 1990 through 1997 to evaluate the long-term effect of 2- and 3-yr rotations on the control of downy brome, jointed goatgrass, and feral rye in winter wheat. At the completion of the study, jointed goatgrass and feral rye densities averaged 8 plants/m2 and < 0.1 plant/m2 for the 2- and 3-yr rotations, respectively. Downy brome densities averaged < 0.5 plant/m2 for both the 2- and 3-yr rotations, with no treatment differences observed. Winter annual grasses were not eradicated after two cycles of the 3-yr rotations, but weed densities were reduced 10-fold compared to densities after one cycle and more than 100-fold compared with the 2-yr rotations. Wheat grain contamination with dockage and foreign material followed a similar trend. The 3-yr rotations were economically competitive with 2-yr rotations and provided superior control of the winter annual grass weeds.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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Footnotes

1

Journal Series 12267 of the University of Nebraska Agricultural Research Division.

References

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