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Evaluation of weed control in acetyl coA carboxylase-resistant rice with mixtures of quizalofop and auxinic herbicides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 December 2019

Tameka L. Sanders
Affiliation:
Graduate Student, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, USA
Jason A. Bond*
Affiliation:
Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, USA
Benjamin H. Lawrence
Affiliation:
Assistant Extension/Research Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, USA
Bobby R. Golden
Affiliation:
Associate Extension/Research Professor, Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, USA
Thomas W. Allen Jr.
Affiliation:
Extension/Research Professor, Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, USA
Taghi Bararpour
Affiliation:
Assistant Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Jason A. Bond Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS38776, USA. Email: jbond@drec.msstate.edu

Abstract

Rice with enhanced tolerance to herbicides that inhibit acetyl coA carboxylase (ACCase) allows POST application of quizalofop, an ACCase-inhibiting herbicide. Two concurrent field studies were conducted in 2017 and 2018 near Stoneville, MS, to evaluate control of grass (Grass Study) and broadleaf (Broadleaf Study) weeds with sequential applications of quizalofop alone and in mixtures with auxinic herbicides applied in the first or second application. Sequential treatments of quizalofop were applied at 119 g ai ha−1 alone and in mixtures with labeled rates of auxinic herbicides to rice at the two- to three-leaf (EPOST) or four-leaf to one-tiller (LPOST) growth stages. In the Grass Study, no differences in rice injury or control of volunteer rice (‘CL151’ and ‘Rex’) were detected 14 and 28 d after last application (DA-LPOST). Barnyardgrass control at 14 and 28 DA-LPOST with quizalofop applied alone or with auxinic herbicides EPOST was ≥93% for all auxinic herbicide treatments except penoxsulam plus triclopyr. Barnyardgrass control was ≥96% with quizalofop applied alone and with auxinic herbicides LPOST. In the Broadleaf Study, quizalofop plus florpyrauxifen-benzyl controlled more Palmer amaranth 14 DA-LPOST than other mixtures with auxinic herbicides, and control with this treatment was greater EPOST compared with LPOST. Hemp sesbania control 14 DA-LPOST was ≤90% with quizalofop plus quinclorac LPOST, orthosulfamuron plus quinclorac LPOST, and triclopyr EPOST or LPOST. All mixtures except quinclorac and orthosulfamuron plus quinclorac LPOST controlled ivyleaf morningglory ≥91% 14 DA-LPOST. Florpyrauxifen-benzyl or triclopyr were required for volunteer soybean control >63% 14 DA-LPOST. To optimize barnyardgrass control and rice yield, penoxsulam plus triclopyr and orthosulfamuron plus quinclorac should not be mixed with quizalofop. Quizalofop mixtures with auxinic herbicides are safe and effective for controlling barnyardgrass, volunteer rice, and broadleaf weeds in ACCase-resistant rice, and the choice of herbicide mixture could be adjusted based on weed spectrum in the treated field.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2019

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Eric Webster, Louisiana State University AgCenter

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