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Response of sweetpotato to pendimethalin application rate and timing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 October 2019

Stephen L. Meyers
Affiliation:
Assistant Extension/Research Professor, North Mississippi Research and Extension Center- Pontotoc Ridge–Flatwoods Branch Experiment Station, Mississippi State University, Pontotoc, MS; current: Assistant Professor, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
Sushila Chaudhari
Affiliation:
Postdoctoral Research Scholar, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
Katherine M. Jennings
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
Donnie K. Miller
Affiliation:
Professor, Northeast Research Station, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, St. Joseph, LA, USA
Mark W. Shankle
Affiliation:
Research Professor, North Mississippi Research and Extension Center-Pontotoc Ridge–Flatwoods Branch Experiment Station, Mississippi State University, Pontotoc, MS, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Field trials were conducted near Pontotoc, Mississippi; Chase, Louisiana; and Clinton, North Carolina, in 2017 and 2018 to determine the effect of pendimethalin rate and timing application on sweetpotato crop tolerance, yield, and storage root quality. Treatments consisted of five pendimethalin rates (266, 532, 1,065, 1,597, and 2,130 g ai ha−1) by two application timings (0 to 1 or 10 to 14 d after transplanting). Additionally, a nontreated check was included for comparison. Crop injury (stunting) was minimal (≤4%) through 6 wk after transplanting (WAP) and no injury was observed from 8 to 14 WAP, regardless of application timing or rate. The nontreated check yielded 6.6, 17.6, 5.5, and 32.1 × 103 kg ha−1 of canner, no. 1, jumbo, and total grades, respectively. Neither pendimethalin application timing nor rate influenced jumbo, no. 1, marketable, or total sweetpotato yield. Overall, these results indicate that pendimethalin will be a valuable addition to the toolkit of sweetpotato growers.

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© Weed Science Society of America, 2019

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