Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Control of Volunteer Glyphosate-Resistant Cotton in Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean

  • Alan C. York (a1), Alexander M. Stewart (a2), P. Roy Vidrine (a2) and A. Stanley Culpepper (a3)
Abstract

Cotton boll weevil has been eradicated from much of the U.S. Cotton Belt. After eradication, a containment program is necessary to detect and destroy reintroduced boll weevils. Crops other than cotton are not monitored for boll weevil, hence fruit on volunteer glyphosate-resistant (GR) cotton in GR soybean could provide oviposition sites for boll weevils and allow the insects to build up undetected. An experiment was conducted at five locations to evaluate control of GR cotton and reduction in cotton fruit production by herbicides commonly used on GR soybean. Cotton control by preemergence (PRE) or postemergence (POST) herbicides alone was inconsistent across locations. Flumetsulam at 45 g ai/ha, imazaquin at 137 g ai/ha, and metribuzin at 360 g ai/ha plus chlorimuron at 60 g ai/ha applied PRE controlled cotton 55 to 100% and reduced cotton fruit production 84 to 100%. Sulfentrazone at 167 g ai/ha plus chlorimuron at 34 g/ha PRE controlled cotton 50 to 91% and reduced fruit 48 to 98%. Metribuzin PRE at 420 g/ha controlled cotton 23 to 97% and reduced fruit 32 to 100%. Flumiclorac at 30 g ai/ha, 2,4-DB dimethylamine salt at 35 g ae/ha, chlorimuron at 12 g ai/ha, and the sodium salt of fomesafen at 420 g ai/ha mixed with glyphosate and applied POST controlled cotton 48 to 100% and reduced fruit production 67 to 100%. Cloransulam at 12 or 18 g ai/ha controlled cotton 3 to 66% and reduced fruit production 5 to 85%. Cotton control and fruit reduction were greatest and most consistent with sequential applications of metribuzin plus chlorimuron PRE followed by chlorimuron, flumiclorac, fomesafen, or 2,4-DB POST. These treatments controlled cotton at least 95% at all locations. Cotton fruit was totally eliminated at three locations and reduced at least 97% at a fourth location.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Corresponding author's E-mail: alan_york@ncsu.edu
References
Hide All
AhouissoussiN. B. C., WetzsteinM. E., and DuffyP. A. 1993. Economic returns to the boll weevil eradication program. J. Agric. Appl. Econ 25:4655.
Anonymous. 2003a. Canopy® SP. in Crop Protection Reference. 18th ed. New York: C & P. Pp. 733738.
Anonymous. 2003b. Dupont™ Canopy XL® . in Crop Protection Reference. 18th ed. New York: C & P. Pp. 738744.
Anonymous. 2003c. Python™ WDG. in Crop Protection Reference. 18th ed. New York: C & P. Pp. 547551.
Anonymous. 2003d. Scepter® 70 DG. in Crop Protection Reference. 18th ed. New York: C & P. Pp. 164170.
Anonymous. 2003e. Sencor® DF. in Crop Protection Reference. 18th ed. New York: C & P. Pp. 733738.
BarkerB., ParkerC. H., KingA. G., and AndersonW. 2001. What's required to finish the job and protect our investment?. in DickersonW. A., BrashearA. L., BrumleyJ. T., CarterF. L., GrefenstetteW. J., and HarrisF. A., eds. Boll Weevil Eradication in the United States through 1999. The Cotton Foundation Reference Book Series Number Six. Memphis, TN: The Cotton Foundation. Pp. 509522.
CarlsonG. A., SappieG., and HammigM. 1989. Economic returns to boll weevil eradication. USDA ERS Agricultural Economics Rep 621:131.
CarterF. L., NelsonT. C., JordanA. G., and SmithJ. R. 2001. U.S. cotton declares war on the boll weevil. in DickersonW. A., BrashearA. L., BrumleyJ. T., CarterF. L., GrefenstetteW. J., and HarrisF. A., eds. Boll Weevil Eradication in the United States through 1999. The Cotton Foundation Reference Book Series Number Six. Memphis, TN: The Cotton Foundation. Pp. 2554.
CoadB. R., TuckerE. S., WilliamsW. B., BondyF. F., and GainesR. C. 1922. Dispersion of the boll weevil in 1921. USDA Department Circ 210:13.
CrossW. H. 1973. Biology, control, and eradication of the boll weevil. Ann. Rev. Entomol 18:1746.
DickersonW. A., CrossG. B., and GrantM. 2001. North Carolina boll weevil eradication and post-eradication programs. in DickersonW. A., BrashearA. L., BrumleyJ. T., CarterF. L., GrefenstetteW. J., and HarrisF. A., eds. Boll Weevil Eradication in the United States through 1999. The Cotton Foundation Reference Book Series Number Six. Memphis, TN: The Cotton Foundation. Pp. 375404.
DuffyP. A. and HishamundaN. 2001. Economic impacts of boll weevil eradication. in DickersonW. A., BrashearA. L., BrumleyJ. T., CarterF. L., GrefenstetteW. J., and HarrisF. A., eds. Boll Weevil Eradication in the United States through 1999. The Cotton Foundation Reference Book Series Number Six. Memphis, TN: The Cotton Foundation. Pp. 157174.
FransR. E., TalbertR., MarxD., and CrowleyH. 1986. Experimental design and techniques for measuring and analyzing plant responses to weed control practices. in CamperN. D., ed. Research Methods in Weed Science. Champaign, IL: Southern Weed Science Society. Pp. 2946.
GrayC. J., ShawD. R., and TagertM. L. 2002. Control of volunteer roundup ready crops in soybean and cotton systems. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc 55:40.
HaneyP. B. 2001. The cotton boll weevil in the United States: impact on cotton production and the people of the cotton belt. in DickersonW. A., BrashearA. L., BrumleyJ. T., CarterF. L., GrefenstetteW. J., and HarrisF. A., eds. Boll Weevil Eradication in the United States through 1999. The Cotton Foundation Reference Book Series Number Six. Memphis, TN: The Cotton Foundation. Pp. 724.
HaneyP. B., HerzogG., and RobertsP. M. 2001. Boll weevil eradication in Georgia. in DickersonW. A., BrashearA. L., BrumleyJ. T., CarterF. L., GrefenstetteW. J., and HarrisF. A., eds. Boll Weevil Eradication in the United States through 1999. The Cotton Foundation Reference Book Series Number Six. Memphis, TN: The Cotton Foundation. Pp. 259290.
MillerD. K., VidrineP. R., LeeD. R., and PerrittA. L. 2001. Weed control and cotton tolerance with Firstrate and Frontrow. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc 54:8.
MurdockE. C., JonesM. A., and GrahamR. F. 2002. Control of volunteer glyphosate resistant (Roundup)—tolerant cotton and soybean in roundup ready cotton. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc 55:14.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (NCDACS). 2003. North Carolina Agriculture Overview: Field Crops:. Web page: http://www.ncagr.com/stats/general/crop%5Ffld.htm. Accessed: April 16, 2004.
PencoeN. L. and PhillipsJ. R. 1987. The cotton boll weevil: legend, myth, and reality. J. Entomol. Sci. Suppl 1:3051.
United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service (USDA ERS). 2003. The Extent of Adoption of Bioengineered Crops:. Web page: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aer810/aer810d.pdf. Accessed: April 16, 2004.
YorkA. C. 2004. Weed Response to Preplant Incorporated and Preemergence Herbicides—Soybeans. 2004 North Carolina Agricultural Chemicals Manual. Web page: http://ipm.ncsu.edu/agchem/agchem.html. Accessed: April 16, 2004.
YorkA. C. and CulpepperA. S. 2001. Weed control and cotton response with Firstrate and Frontrow post-directed. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc 54:7.
YorkA. C., WilcutJ. W., KeeneM. M., and WallsF. R.Jr. 1991. Soybean (Glycine max) response to postemergence herbicide mixtures containing 2,4-DB. Weed Technol. 5:4347.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Weed Technology
  • ISSN: 0890-037X
  • EISSN: 1550-2740
  • URL: /core/journals/weed-technology
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 4 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 38 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th January 2017 - 22nd October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.