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Rate and Application Timing Effects on Tolerance of Covington Sweetpotato to S-Metolachlor

  • Stephen L. Meyers (a1), Katherine M. Jennings (a1), David W. Monks (a1), Donnie K. Miller (a2) and Mark W. Shankle (a3)...

Abstract

Field studies were conducted in 2011 and 2012 at the Horticultural Crops Research Station near Clinton, NC, to determine ‘Covington' sweetpotato tolerance to S-metolachlor rate and application timing. Treatments were a factorial arrangement of four S-metolachlor rates (0, 1.1, 2.2, or 3.4 kg ai ha−1) and six application timings (0, 2, 5, 7, 9, or 14 d after transplanting [DAP]). Immediately following application, 1.9 cm of irrigation was applied to individual plots. Sweetpotato injury was minimal for all treatments (≤ 10%). No. 1 grade sweetpotato yield displayed a negative linear response to S-metolachlor rate, and decreased from 25,110 to 20,100 kg ha−1 as S-metolachlor rate increased from 0 to 3.4 kg ha−1. Conversely, no. 1 sweetpotato yield displayed a positive linear response to S-metolachlor application timing and increased from 19,670 to 27,090 kg ha−1 as timing progressed from 0 to 14 DAP. Total marketable sweetpotato yield displayed a quadratic response to both S-metolachlor application rate and timing. Total marketable yield decreased from 44,950 to 30,690 kg ha−1 as S-metolachlor rate increased from 0 to 3.4 kg ha−1. Total marketable yield increased from 37,800 to 45,780 kg ha−1 as application timing was delayed from 0 to 14 DAP. At 1.1 kg ha−1 S-metolachlor, sweetpotato storage root length to width ratio displayed a quadratic relationship to application timing and increased from 1.87 to 2.23 for applications made 0 to 14 DAP. At 2.2 kg ha−1 of S-metolachlor, sweetpotato length to width ratio displayed a quadratic response to application timing, increased from 1.57 to 2.09 for 0 to 10 DAP, and decreased slightly from 2.09 to 2.03 for 10 to 14 DAP. Application timing did not influence length to width ratio of sweetpotato storage roots for those plots treated with S-metolachlor at either 0 or 3.4 kg ha−1.

En 2011 y 2012, se realizaron estudios de campo en la Estación de Investigación de Cultivos Hortícolas, cerca de Clinton, NC, para determinar la tolerancia de la batata ‘Covington' según la dosis de S-metolachlor y el momento de aplicación. Los tratamientos fueron arreglados en forma factorial con cuatro dosis de S-metolachlor (0, 1.1, 2.2, ó 3.4 kg ai ha−1) y seis momentos de aplicación (0, 2, 5 7, 9, ó 14 días después del trasplante [DAP]). Inmediatamente después de la aplicación, se aplicaron 1.9 cm de riego a cada parcela. El daño a la batata fue mínimo en todos los tratamientos (≤10%). El rendimiento de batata grado no. 1 mostró una respuesta linear negativa a las dosis de S-metolachlor, y disminuyó de 25,110 a 20,100 kg ha−1 al incrementarse la dosis de S-metolachlor de 0 a 3.4 kg ha−1. En contraste, el rendimiento de la batata no. 1 mostró una respuesta linear positiva al momento de aplicación de S-metolachlor e incrementó de 19,670 a 27,090 kg ha−1 cuando se pasó de 0 a 14 DAP. El rendimiento comercializable disminuyó de 44,950 a 30,690 kg ha−1 al aumentarse la dosis de S-metolachlor de 0 a 3.4 kg ha−1. El rendimiento comercializable aumentó de 37,800 a 45,780 kg ha−1 cuando se retrasó el momento de aplicación de 0 a 14 DAP. A 1.1 kg ha−1 S-metolachlor, el ratio longitud/grosor de las raíces de almacenamiento mostraron una relación cuadrática con el momento de aplicación e incrementaron de 1.87 a 2.23 para aplicaciones hechas de 0 a 14 DAP. A 2.2 kg ha−1 de S-metolachlor, el ratio longitud/grosor mostró una respuesta cuadrática en respuesta al momento de aplicación, e incrementó de 1.57 a 2.09 de 0 a 10 DAP, y disminuyó ligeramente de 2.09 a 2.03 de 10 a 14 DAP. El momento de aplicación no influenció el ratio longitud/grosor de las raíces de almacenamiento de la batata para las parcelas tratadas con S-metolachlor ya sea a 0 ó 3.4 kg ha−1.

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Corresponding author

Corresponding author's E-mail: smeyers@ext.msstate.edu

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Weed Technology
  • ISSN: 0890-037X
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