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Prediction of Turbulent Flows
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  • Cited by 3
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Ibrahim, Akram Bialy, Esmail M. Hassan, Mohamed M. and Khalil, Essam E. 2014. 50th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference.

    Lavers, Doug Beitelman, Len and Curran, Chris 2010. Digests of the 2010 14th Biennial IEEE Conference on Electromagnetic Field Computation. p. 1.

    Eidsvik, Karl J. 2008. Prediction Errors Associated with Sparse Grid Estimates of Flows over Hills. Boundary-Layer Meteorology, Vol. 127, Issue. 1, p. 153.


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  • Edited by Geoff Hewitt, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London , Christos Vassilicos, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London

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    Prediction of Turbulent Flows
    • Online ISBN: 9780511543227
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511543227
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Book description

The prediction of turbulent flows is of paramount importance in the development of complex engineering systems involving flow, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions. Arising from a programme held at the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge, this volume reviews the current situation regarding the prediction of such flows through the use of modern computational fluid dynamics techniques, and attempts to address the inherent problem of modelling turbulence. In particular, the current physical understanding of such flows is summarised and the resulting implications for simulation discussed. The volume continues by surveying current approximation methods whilst discussing their applicability to industrial problems. This major work concludes by providing a specific set of guidelines for selecting the most appropriate model for a given problem. Unique in its breadth and critical approach, this book will be of immense value to experienced practitioners and researchers, continuing the UK's strong tradition in fluid dynamics.

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