Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-s84wp Total loading time: 0.437 Render date: 2022-07-05T13:23:36.608Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2012

Thomas E. Currie
Affiliation:
Human Evolutionary Ecology Group, Department of Anthropology, University College London, London WC1H 0BW, United Kingdom. t.currie@ucl.ac.ukr.mace@ucl.ac.ukhttp://www.ucl.ac.uk/~ucsatechttp://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/staff/r_macehttp://www.ucl.ac.uk/heeg
Ruth Mace
Affiliation:
Human Evolutionary Ecology Group, Department of Anthropology, University College London, London WC1H 0BW, United Kingdom. t.currie@ucl.ac.ukr.mace@ucl.ac.ukhttp://www.ucl.ac.uk/~ucsatechttp://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/staff/r_macehttp://www.ucl.ac.uk/heeg

Abstract

Re-analysis of the data provided in the target article reveals a lack of evidence for a strong, universal relationship between parasite stress and the variables relating to sociality. Furthermore, even if associations between these variables do exist, the analyses presented here do not provide evidence for Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) proposed causal mechanism.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Currie, T. E., Greenhill, S. J. & Mace, R. (2010) Is horizontal transmission really a problem for phylogenetic comparative methods? A simulation study using continuous cultural traits. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 365:3903–12.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Currie, T. E. & Mace, R. (2009) Political complexity predicts the spread of ethnolinguistic groups. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 106(18):7339–44.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Currie, T. E. & Mace, R. (in press) The evolution of ethnolinguistic diversity. Advances in Complex Systems. DOI:10.1142/S0219525911003372.Google Scholar
Diamond, J. (1997) Guns, germs and steel. Vintage.Google Scholar
Mace, R. & Jordan, F. M. (2011) Macro-evolutionary studies of cultural diversity: A review of empirical studies of cultural transmission and cultural adaptation. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 366(1563):402–11.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murdock, G. P. (1949) Social structure. MacMillan.Google Scholar
Raudenbush, S. W. & Bryk, A. S. (2002) Hierarchical linear models: Applications and data analysis methods. Sage.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *