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Appreciating methodological complexity and integrating neurobiological perspectives to advance the science of resilience

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2015

Birgit Kleim
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Zurich; 8006 Zurich, Switzerlandb.kleim@psychologie.uzh.ch
Isaac R. Galatzer-Levy
Affiliation:
School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY 10016. Isaac.Galatzer-Levy@nyumc.org

Abstract

Kalisch and colleagues identify several routes to a better understanding of mechanisms underlying resilience and highlight the need to integrate findings from neuroscience and animal learning. We argue that appreciating methodological complexity and integrating neurobiological perspectives will advance the science of resilience and ultimately help improve the lives of those exposed to stress and adversity.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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