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Beyond simple utility in predicting self-control fatigue: A proximate alternative to the opportunity cost model

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 December 2013

Michael Inzlicht
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4, Canada. michael.inzlicht@utoronto.cawww.michaelinzlicht.com
Brandon J. Schmeichel
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-4235. schmeichel@tamu.eduhttps://sites.google.com/site/bjschmeichel/

Abstract

The opportunity cost model offers an ultimate explanation of ego depletion that helps to move the field beyond biologically improbable resource accounts. The model's more proximate explanation, however, falls short of accounting for much data and is based on an outdated view of human rationality. We suggest that our own process model offers a better proximate account of self-control fatigue.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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