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Bringing development into a universal model of reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 August 2012

S. Hélène Deacon*
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, Dalhousie University, Life Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada. Helene.deacon@dal.cahttp://langlitlab.psychology.dal.ca/

Abstract

Reading development is integral to a universal model of reading. Developmental research can tell us which factors drive reading acquisition and which are the product of reading. Like adult research, developmental research needs to be contextualised within the language and writing system and it needs to include key cross-linguistic evaluations. This will create a universal model of reading development.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

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