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Do innate stereotypies serve as a basis for swallowing and learned speech movements?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2017

Connor Mayer
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095. connormayer@ucla.edu http://www.linguistics.ucla.edu/people/grads/connormayer/
Francois Roewer-Despres
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C9, Canada. francois.roewerdespres@usask.ca http://biglab.ca/profiles/francois-roewer-despres.php
Ian Stavness
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. ian.stavness@usask.ca http://www.cs.usask.ca/faculty/stavness/
Bryan Gick
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. ian.stavness@usask.ca http://www.cs.usask.ca/faculty/stavness/ Haskins Laboratories, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511. gick@mail.ubc.ca http://linguistics.ubc.ca/persons/bryan-gick/

Abstract

Keven & Akins suggest that innate stereotypies like TP/R may participate in the acquisition of tongue control. This commentary examines this claim in the context of speech motor learning and biomechanics, proposing that stereotypies could provide a basis for both swallowing and speech movements, and provides biomechanical simulation results to supplement neurological evidence for similarities between the two behaviors.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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Do innate stereotypies serve as a basis for swallowing and learned speech movements?
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