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Does distance from the equator predict self-control? Lessons from the Human Penguin Project

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2017

Hans IJzerman
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlandsh.ijzerman@gmail.comhttp://www.hansijzerman.org
Marija V. Čolić
Affiliation:
Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11030, Serbiamrjcolic@gmail.comdusanka.lazarevic@fsfv.bg.ac.rs
Marie Hennecke
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich 8050, Switzerlandm.hennecke@psychologie.uzh.ch
Youngki Hong
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106; youngki.hong@psych.ucsb.edukyle.ratner@psych.ucsb.eduhttps://labs.psych.ucsb.edu/ratner/kyle/principal-investigator.html
Chuan-Peng Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, Chinahcp4715@gmail.com
Jennifer Joy-Gaba
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284-2018; jjoygaba@vcu.eduhttp://www.jenniferjoygaba.com/
Dušanka Lazarević
Affiliation:
Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11030, Serbiamrjcolic@gmail.comdusanka.lazarevic@fsfv.bg.ac.rs
Ljiljana B. Lazarević
Affiliation:
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11000, Serbialjiljana.lazarevic@f.bg.ac.rsdarkostojilovic@gmail.com
Michal Parzuchowski
Affiliation:
SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Campus in Sopot, Sopot 81-745, Polandmparzuchowski@swps.edu.pl
Kyle G. Ratner
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106; youngki.hong@psych.ucsb.edukyle.ratner@psych.ucsb.eduhttps://labs.psych.ucsb.edu/ratner/kyle/principal-investigator.html
Thomas Schubert
Affiliation:
University of Oslo, Department of Psychology, Oslo 0317, Norwaythomas.schubert@psykologi.uio.nohttp://kamamutalab.org/
Astrid Schütz
Affiliation:
Fakultät Humanwissenschaften, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg, Bamberg D-96045, Germanyastrid.schuetz@uni-bamberg.de
Darko Stojilović
Affiliation:
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11000, Serbialjiljana.lazarevic@f.bg.ac.rsdarkostojilovic@gmail.com
Sophia C. Weissgerber
Affiliation:
Institut für Psychology, Universität Kassel, Kassel 34127, Germanyscweissgerber@uni-kassel.de
Janis Zickfeld
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo 0317, Norwayj.h.zickfeld@psykologi.uio.no
Siegwart Lindenberg
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology (ICS), University of Groningen, Groningen 9712 TG, The Netherlandss.m.lindenberg@rug.nl Tilburg Institute for Behavioral Economics Research (TIBER), Tilburg University, Tilburg 5037 AB, The Netherlands

Abstract

We comment on the proposition “that lower temperatures and especially greater seasonal variation in temperature call for individuals and societies to adopt … a greater degree of self-control” (Van Lange et al., sect. 3, para. 4) for which we cannot find empirical support in a large data set with data-driven analyses. After providing greater nuance in our theoretical review, we suggest that Van Lange et al. revisit their model with an eye toward the social determinants of self-control.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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