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Enactive neuroscience, the direct perception hypothesis, and the socially extended mind

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2015

Tom Froese*
Affiliation:
Departamento de Ciencias de la Computación, Instituto de Investigaciones en Matemáticas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, DF 04510, Mexico; Centro de Ciencias de la Complejidad, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, DF 04510, Mexico. t.froese@gmail.comhttp://froese.wordpress.com

Abstract

Pessoa's The Cognitive-Emotional Brain (2013) is an integrative approach to neuroscience that complements other developments in cognitive science, especially enactivism. Both accept complexity as essential to mind; both tightly integrate perception, cognition, and emotion, which enactivism unifies in its foundational concept of sense-making; and both emphasize that the spatial extension of mental processes is not reducible to specific brain regions and neuroanatomical connectivity. An enactive neuroscience is emerging.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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