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Epigenetic-based hormesis and age-dependent altruism: Additions to the behavioural constellation of deprivation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2017

William Michael Brown
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Faculty of Creative Arts, Technologies & Science, University of Bedfordshire, Luton LU1 3JU, UK. william.brown@beds.ac.uk rose.olding@study.beds.ac.uk https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/departments/psychology/staff/dr-william-brown
Rose Jyoti Olding
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Faculty of Creative Arts, Technologies & Science, University of Bedfordshire, Luton LU1 3JU, UK. william.brown@beds.ac.uk rose.olding@study.beds.ac.uk https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/departments/psychology/staff/dr-william-brown
Corresponding

Abstract

We support Pepper and Nettle's (P&N's) hypothesised adaptive responses to deprivation. However, we argue that adaptive responses to stress shift with age. Specifically, present-oriented behaviours are adaptive for young people (e.g., in terms of mating and reproduction) but costly for older people in deprived communities who would benefit from investing in grandchildren. Epigenetic mechanisms may be responsible for age-related tactical shifts.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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