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How functional are functional viewing fields?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 May 2017

Árni Kristjánsson
Affiliation:
Faculty of Psychology, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, 101, Reykjavík, Iceland. ak@hi.is andrey@hi.is manjebrinkhuis@gmail.com
Andrey Chetverikov
Affiliation:
Faculty of Psychology, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, 101, Reykjavík, Iceland. ak@hi.is andrey@hi.is manjebrinkhuis@gmail.com
Manje Brinkhuis
Affiliation:
Faculty of Psychology, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, 101, Reykjavík, Iceland. ak@hi.is andrey@hi.is manjebrinkhuis@gmail.com
Corresponding

Abstract

Hulleman & Olivers' (H&O's) proposal is a refreshing addition to the visual search literature. Although we like their proposal that fixations, not individual items should be considered a fundamental unit in visual search, we point out some unresolved problems that their account will have to solve. Additionally, we consider predictions that can be made from the account, in particular in relation to priming of visual search, finding that the account generates interesting testable predictions.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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