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Is ego depletion too incredible? Evidence for the overestimation of the depletion effect

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 December 2013

Evan C. Carter
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0751. mikem@miami.eduevan.c.carter@gmail.com
Michael E. McCullough
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0751. mikem@miami.eduevan.c.carter@gmail.com

Abstract

The depletion effect, a decreased capacity for self-control following previous acts of self-control, is thought to result from a lack of necessary psychological/physical resources (i.e., “ego depletion”). Kurzban et al. present an alternative explanation for depletion; but based on statistical techniques that evaluate and adjust for publication bias, we question whether depletion is a real phenomenon in need of explanation.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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References

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