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The limitations of structural priming are not the limits of linguistic theory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2017

David Adger*
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom. d.j.adger@qmul.ac.uk http://www.davidadger.org

Abstract

Structural priming is a useful technique for testing the predictions of linguistic theories, but one cannot conclude anything definitively about the shape of those theories from any particular methodology.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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