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Oh, the number of things you will process (in parallel)!

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 May 2017

Alejandro Lleras
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820. alejandrolleras@gmail.comcronin2@illinois.eduamadiso2@illinois.eduzhiyuanwang42@gmail.comsbuetti@gmail.comhttp://www.psychology.illinois.edu/people/alleras
Deborah A. Cronin
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820. alejandrolleras@gmail.comcronin2@illinois.eduamadiso2@illinois.eduzhiyuanwang42@gmail.comsbuetti@gmail.comhttp://www.psychology.illinois.edu/people/alleras
Anna M. Madison
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820. alejandrolleras@gmail.comcronin2@illinois.eduamadiso2@illinois.eduzhiyuanwang42@gmail.comsbuetti@gmail.comhttp://www.psychology.illinois.edu/people/alleras
Marshall Wang
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820. alejandrolleras@gmail.comcronin2@illinois.eduamadiso2@illinois.eduzhiyuanwang42@gmail.comsbuetti@gmail.comhttp://www.psychology.illinois.edu/people/alleras
Simona Buetti
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820. alejandrolleras@gmail.comcronin2@illinois.eduamadiso2@illinois.eduzhiyuanwang42@gmail.comsbuetti@gmail.comhttp://www.psychology.illinois.edu/people/alleras

Abstract

We highlight the importance of considering the variance produced during the parallel processing stage in vision and present a case for why it is useful to consider the “item” as a meaningful unit of study when investigating early visual processing in visual search tasks.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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