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Orange is the new aesthetic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2017

Anjan Chatterjee
Affiliation:
Pennsylvania Hospital of Penn Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. Anjan@mail.med.upenn.edu http://ccn.upenn.edu/chatterjee/anjan.html
Corresponding
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Abstract

The Distancing-Embracing model proposes that negative emotions are constitutive of aesthetic experiences. This move is welcome and adds depth to empirical aesthetics. However, the model's emphasis on temporality challenges how best to think of static art forms. I suggest that “decisive” and “distilled” moments dilate time in the viewer's mind and might allow the model to accommodate photography and painting.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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