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Parallel attentive processing and pre-attentive guidance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 May 2017

Hermann J. Müller
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich D-80802, Germany; hmueller@psy.lmu.de heinrich.liesefeld@psy.lmu.de http://www.psy.lmu.de/exp/people/prof/mueller/ http://www.psy.lmu.de/exp/people/ma/liesefeld_hr/ Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck College, University of London, London WC1E 7HX, United Kingdom; http://www.bbk.ac.uk/psychology/our-staff/academic/hermann-muller
Heinrich René Liesefeld
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich D-80802, Germany; hmueller@psy.lmu.de heinrich.liesefeld@psy.lmu.de http://www.psy.lmu.de/exp/people/prof/mueller/ http://www.psy.lmu.de/exp/people/ma/liesefeld_hr/
Rani Moran
Affiliation:
Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, London WC1B 5EH, United Kingdom; rani.moran@gmail.com https://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/browse/profile?upi=RMORA40 Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom; School of Psychological Sciences and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel. marius@post.tau.ac.il https://en-social-sciences.tau.ac.il/profile/marius
Marius Usher
Affiliation:
School of Psychological Sciences and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel. marius@post.tau.ac.il https://en-social-sciences.tau.ac.il/profile/marius

Abstract

This commentary focuses on two related, open questions in Hulleman & Olivers' (H&O's) proposal: (1) the nature of the parallel attentive process that determines target presence within, and thus presumably the size of, the functional visual field, and (2) how the pre-attentive guidance mechanism must be conceived to also account for search performance in tasks that afford no reliable target-based guidance.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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