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Prediction in processing is a by-product of language learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2013

Franklin Chang
Affiliation:
University of Liverpool, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, Liverpool L69 7ZA, United Kingdom. Franklin.Chang@liverpool.ac.ukhttp://www.liv.ac.uk/psychology-health-and-society/staff/franklin-chang/crowland@liverpool.ac.ukhttp://www.liv.ac.uk/psychology-health-and-society/staff/caroline-rowland/
Evan Kidd
Affiliation:
The Australian National University, Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia. evan.kidd@anu.edu.auhttp://psychology.anu.edu.au/_people/people_details.asp?recId=594
Caroline F. Rowland
Affiliation:
University of Liverpool, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, Liverpool L69 7ZA, United Kingdom. Franklin.Chang@liverpool.ac.ukhttp://www.liv.ac.uk/psychology-health-and-society/staff/franklin-chang/crowland@liverpool.ac.ukhttp://www.liv.ac.uk/psychology-health-and-society/staff/caroline-rowland/

Abstract

Both children and adults predict the content of upcoming language, suggesting that prediction is useful for learning as well as processing. We present an alternative model which can explain prediction behaviour as a by-product of language learning. We suggest that a consideration of language acquisition places important constraints on Pickering & Garrod's (P&G's) theory.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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