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Priming is swell, but it's far from simple

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2017

Jayden Ziegler
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138. ziegler@g.harvard.edu snedeker@wjh.harvard.edu http://www.jaydenziegler.com https://software.rc.fas.harvard.edu/lds/research/snedeker/jesse-snedeker/
Jesse Snedeker
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138. ziegler@g.harvard.edu snedeker@wjh.harvard.edu http://www.jaydenziegler.com https://software.rc.fas.harvard.edu/lds/research/snedeker/jesse-snedeker/
Eva Wittenberg
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics, University of California, La Jolla, CA 92093. ewittenberg@ucsd.edu http://www.evawittenberg.com/i/start.html

Abstract

Clearly, structural priming is a valuable tool for probing linguistic representation. But we don't think that the existing results provide strong support for Branigan & Pickering's (B&P's) model, largely because the priming effects are more confusing and diverse than their theory would suggest. Fortunately, there are a number of other experimental tools available, and linguists are increasingly making use of them.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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Priming is swell, but it's far from simple
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