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The temporal dynamics of resilience: Neural recovery as a biomarker

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2015

Henrik Walter
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Division of Mind and Brain Research, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 10177 Berlin, Germany. henrik.walter@charite.desusanne.erk@charite.deilya.veer@charite.dehttp://mindandbrain.charite.de/
Susanne Erk
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Division of Mind and Brain Research, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 10177 Berlin, Germany. henrik.walter@charite.desusanne.erk@charite.deilya.veer@charite.dehttp://mindandbrain.charite.de/
Ilya M. Veer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Division of Mind and Brain Research, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 10177 Berlin, Germany. henrik.walter@charite.desusanne.erk@charite.deilya.veer@charite.dehttp://mindandbrain.charite.de/

Abstract

Resilience can be defined as the capability of an individual to maintain health despite stress and adversity. Here we suggest to study the temporal dynamics of neural processes associated with affective perturbation and emotion regulation at different time scales to investigate the mechanisms of resilience. Parameters related to neural recovery might serve as a predictive biomarker for resilience.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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References

Erk, S., Kalckreuth, A. & Walter, H. (2010a) Neural long-term effects of emotion regulation on episodic memory processes. Neuropsychologia 48(4):989–96.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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