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Using foresight to prioritise the present

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2017

Adam Bulley
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australiaadam.bulley@uqconnect.edu.aut.suddendorf@psy.uq.edu.auhttps://www.psy.uq.edu.au/directory/index.html?id=2472https://www.psy.uq.edu.au/directory/index.html?id=39
Gillian Pepper
Affiliation:
Centre for Behaviour and Evolution at Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom. gillian.pepper@ncl.ac.ukhttps://gillianpepper.com/
Thomas Suddendorf
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australiaadam.bulley@uqconnect.edu.aut.suddendorf@psy.uq.edu.auhttps://www.psy.uq.edu.au/directory/index.html?id=2472https://www.psy.uq.edu.au/directory/index.html?id=39

Abstract

Planning for the future may encourage apparently “impulsive” behaviour when the future is anticipated to be bleak. Thus, a seeming failure of self-control in reactive violence could be caused not by a disinclination to plan ahead, but by virtue of this ability. Furthermore, we point to empirical and theoretical shortcomings in the authors' case, such as a failure to distinguish proximate and ultimate explanations.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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