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“Well, that's one way”: Interactivity in parsing and production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2013

Christine Howes
Affiliation:
Queen Mary University of London, Cognitive Science Research Group, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom. c.howes@qmul.ac.uk http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/~chrizba/ ph@eecs.qmul.ac.uk arash@eecs.qmul.ac.uk julian.hough@eecs.qmul.ac.uk
Patrick G. T. Healey
Affiliation:
Queen Mary University of London, Cognitive Science Research Group, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom. c.howes@qmul.ac.uk http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/~chrizba/ ph@eecs.qmul.ac.uk arash@eecs.qmul.ac.uk julian.hough@eecs.qmul.ac.uk
Arash Eshghi
Affiliation:
Queen Mary University of London, Cognitive Science Research Group, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom. c.howes@qmul.ac.uk http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/~chrizba/ ph@eecs.qmul.ac.uk arash@eecs.qmul.ac.uk julian.hough@eecs.qmul.ac.uk
Julian Hough
Affiliation:
Queen Mary University of London, Cognitive Science Research Group, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom. c.howes@qmul.ac.uk http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/~chrizba/ ph@eecs.qmul.ac.uk arash@eecs.qmul.ac.uk julian.hough@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

Abstract

We present empirical evidence from dialogue that challenges some of the key assumptions in the Pickering & Garrod (P&G) model of speaker-hearer coordination in dialogue. The P&G model also invokes an unnecessarily complex set of mechanisms. We show that a computational implementation, currently in development and based on a simpler model, can account for more of this type of dialogue data.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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References

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