Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Newer generation antidepressants for young people: Real-life evidence needed: Commentary on… Cochrane Corner

  • Haseena Hussain, Bernadka Dubicka and Paul Wilkinson
Summary

Major depressive disorder in children and adolescents is common and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This 2012 meta-analysis by Hetrick et al shows statistically significant, but small, improvements in depressive symptom scores and probability of remission with second-generation antidepressants (SGAs) compared with placebo. SGAs lead to a small, but significant, increase in risk of suicidal thoughts/attempts compared with placebo. Patients included in the primary studies had milder depression, less psychiatric comorbidity and less suicidality than those normally seen in clinical practice in the UK's National Health Service. However, primary studies had significant methodological shortcomings. Therefore, caution is needed when trying to generalise results to clinical practice.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Newer generation antidepressants for young people: Real-life evidence needed
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Newer generation antidepressants for young people: Real-life evidence needed
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Newer generation antidepressants for young people: Real-life evidence needed
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence Dr Haseena Hussain, University of Cambridge, Developmental Psychiatry, Douglas House, 18b Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 8AH, UK. Email: hh448@medschl.cam.ac.uk
Footnotes
Hide All

See p. 74, this issue.

Declaration of Interest

None

Footnotes
References
Hide All
American Psychiatric Association (2000) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edn) (DSM-IV). APA.
Avenevoli, S, Swendsen, J, He, J-P, et al (2015) Major depression in the National Comorbidity Survey–Adolescent Supplement: prevalence, correlates, and treatment. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 54: 3744.
Bridge, J, Birmaher, B, Iyengar, S, et al (2009) Placebo response in randomised controlled trials of antidepressants for pediatric major depressive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 166: 42–9.
Cipriani, A, Zhou, X, Giovane, C, et al (2016) Comparative efficacy and tolerability of antidepressants for major depressive disorder in children and adolescents: a network meta-analysis. Lancet, 388: 881–90.
Dubicka, B, Elvins, R, Roberts, C, et al (2010) Combined treatment with cognitive–behavioural therapy in adolescent depression: meta-analysis. British Journal of Psychiatry, 197: 433–40.
Goodyer, IM, Dubicka, B, Wilkinson, P, et al (2008) A randomised controlled trial of cognitive behaviour therapy in adolescents with major depression treated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: the ADAPT trial. Health Technology Assessment, 12 (14): ix, 1–60.
Hammad, TA (2004) Relationship between Psychotropic Drugs and Pediatric Suicidality. US Food and Drug Administration.
Hazell, P, O'Connell, D, Heathcote, D, et al (1995) Efficacy of tricyclic drugs in treating child and adolescent depression: a meta-analysis. BMJ, 310: 897901.
Hetrick, SE, Merry, SN, McKenzie, JE, et al (2007) Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depressive disorders in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 3: CD004851 (doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004851.pub2).
Hetrick, SE, McKenzie, JE, Cox, GR, et al (2012) Newer generation antidepressants for depressive disorders in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 11: CD004851 (doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004851.pub3).
Ipser, JC, Stein, DJ, Hawkridge, S, et al (2009) Pharmacotherapy for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents (Review). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 3: CD005170 (doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005170.pub2).
Kaufman, J, Martin, A, King, R, et al (2001) Are child-, adolescent-, and adult-onset depression one and the same disorder? Biological Psychiatry, 49: 9801001.
March, J, Silva, S, Petrycki, S, et al (2004) Fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and their combination for adolescents with depression: Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) randomized controlled trial. JAMA, 292: 807–20.
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2005) Depression in Children and Young People: Identification and Management (Updated March 2015) (Clinical Guideline CG28). NICE.
Nutt, DJ, Malizia, AL (2008) Why does the world have such a ‘down’ on antidepressants? Journal of Psychopharmacology, 22: 223–6.
Vitiello, B, Zuvekas, S, Norquist, G (2006) National estimates of antidepressant medication use among U.S. children, 1997–2002. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 45: 271–9.
Weissmann, MM, Wolk, S, Goldstein, RB, et al (1999) Depressed adolescents grown up. JAMA, 281: 1707–13.
World Health Organization (2004) ICD-10: International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (2nd edn) (vol. 3). WHO.
Wilson, S, Hicks, B, Foster, K, et al (2015) Age of onset and course of major depressive disorder: associations with psychosocial functioning outcomes in adulthood. Psychological Medicine, 45: 505–14.
Zisook, S, Lesser, I, Stewart, JW, et al (2007) Effect of age at onset on the course of major depressive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 164: 1539–46.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 2056-4678
  • EISSN: 2056-4686
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 37 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 89 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 25th May 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Newer generation antidepressants for young people: Real-life evidence needed: Commentary on… Cochrane Corner

  • Haseena Hussain, Bernadka Dubicka and Paul Wilkinson
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *