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The beneficial effect of a diet with low glycaemic index on 24 h glucose profiles in healthy young people as assessed by continuous glucose monitoring

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2007

Audrey E. Brynes
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0HS, UK
Jacqui Adamson
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0HS, UK
Anne Dornhorst
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0HS, UK
Gary S. Frost*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0HS, UK
*
*Corresponding author: Dr G. S. Frost, fax +44 208 383 3379, email g.frost@ic.ac.uk
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Abstract

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Elevated postprandial glycaemia has been linked to CVD in a number of different epidemiological studies involving predominantly non-diabetic volunteers. The MiniMed continuous glucose monitor, which measures blood glucose every 5 min, over a 24 h period, was used to investigate changes in blood glucose readings before and after instigating a diet with low glycaemic index (GI) for 1 week in free-living healthy individuals. Nine healthy people (age 27 (sem 1·3) years, BMI 23·7 (sem 0·7) kg/m2, one male, eight females) completed the study. A reduction in GI (59·7 (sem 2) v. 52·1 (sem 2), P<0·01) occurred in all nine subjects while energy and other macronutrients remained constant. A significant reduction was also observed in fasting glucose at 06·00 hours (5·4 (sem 0·2) v. 4·4 (sem 0·3) mmol/l, P<0·001), mean glucose (5·6 (sem 0·2) v. 5·1 (sem 0·2) mmol/l, P=0·004), area under the 24 h glucose curve (8102 (sem 243) v. 750 (sem 235) mmol/l per min, P=0·004) and area under the overnight, 8 h glucose curve (2677 (sem 92) v. 2223 (sem 121) mmol/l per min, P=0·01). The present study provides important data on how a simple adjustment to the diet can improve glucose profiles that, if sustained in the long term, would be predicted from epidemiological studies to have a favourable influence on CVD.

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2005

References

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