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Differences in postprandial inflammatory responses to a ‘modern’ v. traditional meat meal: a preliminary study

  • Fatemeh Arya (a1), Sam Egger (a2), David Colquhoun (a3), David Sullivan (a4), Sebely Pal (a5) and Garry Egger (a6)...
Abstract

A low-grade inflammatory response (‘metaflammation’) has been found to be associated with certain chronic diseases. Proposed inducers of this have been aspects of the modern lifestyle, including newly introduced foods. Plasma TAG, and the inflammatory cytokines C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-α and IL-6 were compared in a randomised, cross-over trial using ten healthy subjects before and after eating 100 g of kangaroo, or a ‘new’ form of hybridised beef (wagyu) separated by about 1 week. Postprandial levels for 1 and 2 h of TAG, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly higher after eating wagyu compared with kangaroo (P = 0·002 for TAG at 1 h, P < 0·001 at 2 h; P < 0·001 for IL-6 and TNF-α at 1 and 2 h). CRP was significantly higher 1 h postprandially after wagyu (P = 0·011) and non-significantly higher 2 h postprandially (P = 0·090). We conclude that the metaflammatory reaction to ingestion of a ‘new’ form of hybridised beef (wagyu) is indicative of a low-grade, systemic, immune reaction when compared with lean game meat (kangaroo). Further studies using isoenergetic intake and isolating fatty acid components of meats are proposed.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Garry Egger, email eggergj@ozemail.com.au
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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