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  • ISSN: 0009-6407 (Print), 1755-2613 (Online)
  • Editors: Euan Cameron Union Theological Seminary, Columbia University, USA , Dana Robert Boston University, USA , Jon Sensbach University of Florida, USA and Andrea Sterk University of Minnesota, USA
  • Editorial board
This quarterly peer-reviewed journal publishes original research articles and book reviews covering all areas of the history of Christianity and its cultural contexts in all places and times, including its non-Western expressions. Specialists and historians of Christianity in general find Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture an international publication regularly cited throughout the world and an invaluable resource.

History blog

  • The Tudor banquet: digital text mining reveals new information
  • 14 August 2018, Louise Stewart
  • This blog accomapnies Louise Stewart’s Historical Journal article ‘Social Status and Classicism in the Visual and Material Culture of the Sweet Today, the term ‘banquet’ is commonly used to refer to any lavish feast.  However, in the Tudor and Stuart period the word had a different, and very specific meaning, referring to a separate meal which consisted solely of sweet foods.  In September 1591, for example, Queen Elizabeth I visited the Earl of Hertford at his estate at Elvetham.  The lavish entertainments provided for the queen during her four day stay included water pageants, fireworks, feasts and a glittering ‘banquet’.  A printed account of the entertainment makes it clear that this banquet was no ordinary meal.  It was served in the garden after supper, ‘all in glass and silver’ and accompanied by a spectacular fireworks display.  The queen was presented with a thousand sweet dishes including sculptural sugar work representing her arms, castles and forts, human figures and mythical and exotic animals as well as preserved fruits and other confections.  This elaborate spectacle was typical of the sweet banquet.…...
  • The National Rise in Residential Segregation
  • 14 August 2018, John Parman and Trevon D. Logan
  • People talk a lot about segregation.  Every week it seems that news reports or some new academic finding shows that segregation is related to some salient outcome....

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