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Conceptual compression and alliterative form – a response to Harbus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2017

MARK TURNER*
Affiliation:
Department of Cognitive Science, Case Western Reserve University, 607 Crawford Hall, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7068, USAturner@case.edu

Extract

Research in our time offers a welcome flood tide of investigation into how cognitively modern human beings use their basic mental operations to think and act. With luck, it will not ebb. It could become standard, in the way that calculus, once it arose, abided. This tide offers special emphasis, crucial for this issue, on the cognitive origins and operations of language and literature, and in particular on the ways in which systems of multimodal forms can be deployed to prompt for mental operation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

Fauconnier, Gilles & Turner, Mark. 2002. The way we think: Conceptual blending and the mind's hidden complexities. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
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Pagán Cánovas, Cristóbal & Turner, Mark. 2016. Generic integration templates for fictive communication. In Pascual, Esther & Sandler, Sergeiy (eds.), The conversation frame: Forms and functions of fictive interaction, 4562. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sweetser, Eve. 2005. Whose rhyme is whose reason? Sound and sense in Cyrano de Bergerac. Language and Literature 15 (1), 2954.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turner, Mark. 2015. Blending in language and communication. In Dąbrowska, Ewa & Divjak, Dagmar (eds.), Handbook of cognitive linguistics, 211–32. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.Google Scholar
Wilson, John. 1949. Egypt. In Frankfort, Henri (ed.), Before philosophy. New York: Pelican.Google ScholarPubMed
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