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Hands-on Learning for Classics: Building an Effective, Long-term Project

  • Kyle Alexander Jazwa

Abstract

In this paper, I explore the use of long-term, hands-on learning activities for Classics courses. I will show that a carefully designed project can complement classroom lectures on Greek and Roman culture and contribute towards the development of students’ critical thinking and group work skills. As an example, I describe a successful hands-on learning project that I designed for my Ancient Greek Cities course at Monmouth College (USA). The students were tasked with researching and building an historically faithful, ancient Greek mudbrick building for the college's annual Classics Day event. With the success of this project in my class, I will show that Classics instructors can pursue similar long-term, hands-on learning activities for engaging students in ancient Greek and Roman culture and teaching essential skills.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

References

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Bigler, A. M. & Hanegan, N. L. (2011). Student content knowledge increases after participation in a hands-on biotechnology intervention. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 20(3), 246-257.
Clarkson, C. & Shipton, C. (2015). Teaching ancient technology using ‘hands-on’ learning and experimental archaeology. Ethnoarchaeology, 7(2), 157-172.
Coles, J. M. (1979). Experimental archaeology. London: Academic Press.
Dickey, E. (2015). An immersion class in ancient education. Journal of Classics Teaching, 16(31), 38-40.
Flick, L. B. (1993). The meanings of hands-on science. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 4, 1-8.
Haury, D. L. & Rillero, P. (1994). Perspectives of hands-on science teaching. Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearing House for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.
Kirkpatrick, G., Orvis, K. & Pittendrigh, B. (2002). A teaching model for biotechnology and genomics education. Journal of Biological Education, 37(1), 31-35.
Lumpe, A. T. & Oliver, J. S. (1991). Dimensions of hands-on science. The American Biology Teacher, 53, 345-348.
Triona, L. M. & Klahr, D. (2007). Hands-on science: does it matter what students’ hands are on? The Science Education Review, 6(4), 126-130.
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Journal of Classics Teaching
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2058-6310
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-classics-teaching
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