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Effect of waves at a gas—liquid interface on a turbulent air flow

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2006

Leonard S. Cohen
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois
Thomas J. Hanratty
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois

Abstract

Air flowing over a liquid surface encounters an increased resistance if waves are present. The relation of this increased resistance to the properties of the waves has been studied. Air and a liquid flowed co-currently in an enclosed channel which is 12 in. wide and 1 in. high and which is long enough so that flow in the air and the liquid and the interfacial structure are fully developed. The drag on interfaces with three-dimensional wave structures was found to increase with the square of the gas velocity and to depend more on the height of the waves than on other parameters characterizing the interface. The ratio of the equivalent sand roughness to the root-mean-square of the fluctuations in the height of the liquid film is approximately equal to 3 √2. The velocity profiles in the gas were found to be different from what has been reported for flows over sand roughened surfaces.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1968 Cambridge University Press

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References

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