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The effects of exercise and diet on olfactory capability in detection dogs*

  • Craig T. Angle (a1), Joseph J. Wakshlag (a1) (a2), Robert L. Gillette (a1), Todd Steury (a1) (a3), Pamela Haney (a1), Jay Barrett (a1) and Terrence Fisher (a1)...
Abstract
Abstract

A previous work suggests that dietary fat may influence canine olfaction. The present study evaluated whether olfactory performance could be influenced by forms of dietary fat and exercise. Seventeen certified detection dogs were fed three different diets (high fat, low fat or high polyunsaturated fat) for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, olfactory testing was performed using a scent wheel in an olfaction laboratory using three explosive materials. The dogs completed eight to twelve scent trials before and after a 30 min treadmill exercise on five consecutive days. A mixed-effect logistic regression model was used to examine how diet, pre- or post-exercise, trial number, odourant, mass of target and target position influenced the probability of dogs alerting on the target odour. There were no significant changes in the dog's ability to find a target odour at threshold amounts. Dogs were 1·42 (1·08, 1·87; 95 % CI) times as likely to find a target on the high polyunsaturated fat diet relative to the high-fat diet (P = 0·009). The low-fat diet was not significantly different from either the high-fat diet or the high polyunsaturated fat diet (P = 0·12). Dogs were 1·49 (1·26, 1·76; 95 % CI) times as likely to find a target prior to exercise relative to after exercise (P < 0·001). Dogs on the high PUFA diet utilising maize oil showed mild improvement in olfaction. The exact reasons are unknown; however, the higher relative amount of linoleic acid in the diet may play a role in olfactory sensation which warrants further examination of optimal diets for detection dogs.

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Copyright
The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/>.
Corresponding author
Corresponding author:Dr R. Gillette, Red Banks Veterinary Hospital, 197 Hance Avenue, Tinton Falls, NJ 07724, USA, fax +1 732 747 3636, email rgillette@sportsvet.com
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This article was published as part of the WALTHAM International Nutritional Sciences Symposium Proceedings 2013.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

1. RC Hill , MS Bloomberg , V Legrand-Defretin , (2000) Maintenance energy requirements and the effect of diet on performance of racing Greyhounds. Am J Vet Res 61, 15661573.

5. EK Altom , GM Davenport , LJ Myers & KA Cummins (2003) Effect of dietary fat source and exercise on odorant-detecting ability of canine athletes. Res Vet Sci 75, 149–55.

9. I Fedorova & N Salem (2006) Omega three fatty acids and rodent behavior. Prostagland Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 75, 271289.

10. B Seebungkert & JW Lynch (2002) Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on voltage-gated potassium and sodium channels in fat olfactory receptor neurons. Eur J Neurosci 16, 20852094.

11. I Gazit & J Terkel (2003) Explosives detection by sniffer dogs following strenuous activity. Appl Anim Behav Sci 81, 149161.

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Journal of Nutritional Science
  • ISSN: 2048-6790
  • EISSN: 2048-6790
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-nutritional-science
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