Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
  • ISSN: 0954-3945 (Print), 1469-8021 (Online)
  • Editors: William Labov University of Pennsylvania, USA, and Rena Torres Cacoullos Pennsylvania State University, USA,
  • Editorial board
Language Variation and Change is the only journal dedicated exclusively to the study of linguistic variation and the capacity to deal with systematic and inherent variation in synchronic and diachronic linguistics. Sociolinguistics involves analysing the interaction of language, culture and society; the more specific study of variation is concerned with the impact of this interaction on the structures and processes of traditional linguistics. Language Variation and Change concentrates on the details of linguistic structure in actual speech production and processing (or writing), including contemporary or historical sources.

Other sociolinguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • Language as Symbolic Power
  • 28 August 2020, Rachel
  •  Written by Claire Kramsch, author of Language as Symbolic Power When twenty years ago I decided to teach an undergraduate course on Language and Power in my German department at UC Berkeley,  I didn’t have any other purpose in mind than to share my newly acquired insights into post-structuralist approaches to language study with students who were learning a foreign language. As they were working hard to acquire French or German and to develop the ability to communicate with foreign others, I wanted to show them how much more there is to language than just grammar and vocabulary. Why, behind their choices of what to say, what not to say, and how to say it, there was a whole power game going . . . → Read More: Language as Symbolic Power...
  • How a #CheekyNandos became more acceptable
  • 03 August 2020, Dan Iredale
  • By Laura R. Bailey (University of Kent) and Mercedes Durham (Cardiff University) Our recent article, A cheeky investigation: Tracking the semantic change of cheeky from monkeys to wines describes the behaviour of cheeky in British and American English. Introduction For Mercedes, growing up in French-speaking Switzerland but speaking American English at home meant having to ‘relearn’ English at school with her classmates. They were learning British English, which, for Mercedes, often led to confusion. Confusion sometimes turned into hilarity, particularly the time she was confronted with a picture of a dog stealing sausages and the exclamation ‘What a cheeky dog!’. Cheeky, for people or dogs, just wasn’t in her vocabulary. Fast forward a couple decades when she moved to the UK, and found that . . . → Read More: How a #CheekyNandos became more acceptable...
  • The Karen Stereotype
  • 28 July 2020, Dan Iredale
  • written by Karen Stollznow, Griffith University, Queensland Karen is a first name, in fact, it’s my first name, but online, “Karen” has evolved to mean so much more than just a name. In recent years, “Karen” has also become a negative stereotype, a meme, and an insulting epithet. The colloquial meaning of “Karen” is multi-faceted and complicated. The term typically refers to a middle-class, middle-aged white woman who is obnoxious and entitled in her behavior, and she is often racist. She is angry, aggressive, and a bully. Her catch-cry is demanding to “Speak to the manager” of an establishment over the slightest inconvenience. In some versions she even wears a stereotypical hairstyle. Her complaints are selfish and petty. For example, Cathy Hill, a patron . . . → Read More: The Karen Stereotype...