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Regional and socio-economic differences in food, nutrient and supplement intake in school-age children in Germany: results from the GINIplus and the LISAplus studies

  • Stefanie Sausenthaler (a1), Marie Standl (a1), Anette Buyken (a2), Peter Rzehak (a1) (a3), Sibylle Koletzko (a4), Carl Peter Bauer (a5), Beate Schaaf (a6), Andrea von Berg (a7), Dietrich Berdel (a7), Michael Borte (a8) (a9), Olf Herbarth (a10), Irina Lehmann (a11), Ursula Krämer (a12), H-Erich Wichmann (a1) (a2) and Joachim Heinrich (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To describe regional differences between eastern and western Germany with regard to food, nutrient and supplement intake in 9–12-year-old children, and analyse its association with parental education and equivalent income.

Design

Data were obtained from the 10-year follow-up of the two prospective birth cohort studies – GINIplus and LISAplus. Data on food consumption and supplement intake were collected using an FFQ, which had been designed for the specific study population. Information on parental educational level and equivalent income was derived from questionnaires. Logistic regression modelling was used to analyse the effect of parental education, equivalent income and region on food intake, after adjusting for potential confounders.

Setting

Germany.

Subjects

A total of 3435 children aged 9–12 years.

Results

Substantial regional differences in food intake were observed between eastern and western Germany. Intakes of bread, butter, eggs, pasta, vegetables/salad and fruit showed a significant direct relationship with the level of parental education after adjusting for potential confounders, whereas intakes of margarine, meat products, pizza, desserts and soft drinks were inversely associated with parental education. Equivalent income had a weaker influence on the child's food intake.

Conclusions

Nutritional education programmes for school-age children should therefore account for regional differences and parental education.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email s.sausenthaler@helmholtz-muenchen.de

Footnotes

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Both authors have contributed equally to the manuscript.

Members of and institutions affiliated with the LISAplus and the GINIplus study groups are listed in the Appendix.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Regional and socio-economic differences in food, nutrient and supplement intake in school-age children in Germany: results from the GINIplus and the LISAplus studies

  • Stefanie Sausenthaler (a1), Marie Standl (a1), Anette Buyken (a2), Peter Rzehak (a1) (a3), Sibylle Koletzko (a4), Carl Peter Bauer (a5), Beate Schaaf (a6), Andrea von Berg (a7), Dietrich Berdel (a7), Michael Borte (a8) (a9), Olf Herbarth (a10), Irina Lehmann (a11), Ursula Krämer (a12), H-Erich Wichmann (a1) (a2) and Joachim Heinrich (a1)...

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