Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-857cdc78dc-d29nz Total loading time: 0.25 Render date: 2022-05-16T05:35:52.859Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

The underweight/overweight household: an exploration of household sociodemographic and dietary factors in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 December 2006

Colleen Doak
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB # 8120 University Square, 123 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC, 27516-3997, USA
Linda Adair
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB # 8120 University Square, 123 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC, 27516-3997, USA
Margaret Bentley
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB # 8120 University Square, 123 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC, 27516-3997, USA
Zhai Fengying
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Barry Popkin*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB # 8120 University Square, 123 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC, 27516-3997, USA
*
Corresponding author: Email popkin@unc.edu
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Objective:

The goal of this paper is to explore the hypothesis that the nutrition transition is related to households having an underweight and an overweight member simultaneously (under/over households and under/over pairs).

Design:

The 1993 China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) was used to test the association between being an under/over household and household characteristics related to the nutrition transition. Sociodemographic and diet patterns were tested for the main age combination of the under/over pairs.

Setting:

In China, 8.1% of all households were found to have underweight and overweight members within the same household.

Subjects:

Results are from the 1993 China Health and Nutrition Survey and are based on a sample of 13814 persons from 3340 households.

Results:

The under/over household was more urban, had a higher income and was more likely to have assets such as a television, a motor vehicle and a washing machine, even after controlling for sociodemographic confounders. The under/over household had a diet that was higher in fat and protein compared with the underweight and normal weight households. There were no significant differences between the under/over and overweight households, with many of the associations near unity. Comparisions of the under/over subgroups by age of the under/over pairs showed some differences by income and occupation, but not for diet.

Conclusions:

It is imperative, as more individuals become exposed to the diet and lifestyle patterns of the nutrition transition, to find effective public health programmes that can simultaneously promote a healthy lifestyle, improve diet quality and address both undernutrition and chronic disease.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © CABI Publishing 2002

References

1Bourne, LT, Langenhoven, ML, Steyn, K, Jooste, PL, Laubscher, JA, Bourne, DE. Nutritional status of 3–6 year-old African children in the Cape Peninsula. East Afr. Med. J. 1994; 71(11): 695702.Google ScholarPubMed
2Steyn, K, Bourne, L, Jooste, P, Fourie, JM, Rossouw, K, Lombard, C. Anthropometric profile of a black population of the Cape Peninsula in South Africa. East Afr. Med. J. 1998; 75: 3540.Google ScholarPubMed
3Doak, C, Monteiro, C, Popkin, BM. The coexistence of obesity and undernutrition in the same households is an emerging phenomenon in lower income countries. Faseb J. 1999; 13(5): A892 [abstract # 673.2].Google Scholar
4Doak, C, Monteiro, C, Popkin, BM. Co-existing overweight and underweight within households is related to the nutrition transition. Faseb J. 2000; 14(4): A792 [abstract # 556.8].Google Scholar
5Doak, CM, Adair, LS, Monteiro, C, Popkin, BM. Overweight and underweight coexist within households in Brazil, China and Russia. J. Nutr. 2000; 130(12): 2965–71.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6Garrett, JL, Ruel, M. Stunted child overweight mother pairs: an emerging policy concern? In: 17th International Congress of Nutrition [special issue]. Ann. Nutr. Metab. 2001; 45(Suppl. 1), 404.Google Scholar
7Delpeuch, F, Maire, B. Obesity and developing countries of the south. Medecine Tropicale 1997; 57(4): 380–8 [in French].Google ScholarPubMed
8Paeratakul, S, Popkin, B, Keyou, G, Adair, L, Stevens, J. Changes in diet and physical activity affect the body mass index of Chinese adults. Int. J. Obes. 1998; 22: 424–31.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9Popkin, BM, Paeratakul, S, Zhai, F, Ge, K. Dietary and environmental correlates of obesity in a population study in China. Obes. Res. 1995; 3(Suppl. 2): 135s–43s.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10Popkin, BM, Keyou, G, Zhai, F, Guo, X, Ma, H, Zohoori, N. The nutrition transition in China: a cross–sectional analysis. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1993; 47(5): 333–46.Google ScholarPubMed
11Popkin, BM. The nutrition transition in low-income countries: an emerging crisis. Nutr. Rev. 1994; 52: 285–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12Popkin, B, Bing, L, Zhai, F. Understanding the nutrition transition: measuring rapid dietary changes in transitional countries. Public Health Nutr. 2001 [in press].Google Scholar
13Zhai, F, Guo, X, Popkin, BM, Ma, L, Wang, Q, Yu, W, et al. The evaluation of the 24-hour individual recall method in China. Food Nutr. Bull. 1996; 17: 154–61.Google Scholar
14Wang, Y, Popkin, B, Zhai, F. The nutritional status and dietary pattern of Chinese, adolescents, 1991 and 1993. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1998; 52(12): 908–16.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15Du, S, Lu, B, Zhai, F, Popkin, BM. A new stage of the nutrition transition in China. Public Health Nutr. 2002; 5: 169–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16Popkin, BM, Paeratakul, S, Zhai, F, Ge, K. A review of dietary and environmental correlates of obesity with emphasis on developing countries. Obes. Res. 1995; 3(Suppl. 2): 145s–53s.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
17Popkin, BM, Paeratakul, S, Ge, K, Fenying, Z. Body weight patterns among the Chinese: results from the 1989 and 1991 China Health and Nutrition Surveys. Am. J. Public Health 1995; 85(5): 690–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
18Guo, X, Popkin, BM, Mroz, TA, Zhai, F. Food price policy can favorably alter macronutrient intake in China. J. Nutr. 1999; 129(5): 9941001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19Ge, K, Weisell, R, Guo, X, Cheng, L, Ma, H, Zhai, F, et al. The body mass index of Chinese adults in the 1980s. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1994; 48: S148–54.Google ScholarPubMed
20Dewnowski, A, Popkin, BM. The nutrition transition: new trends in the global diet. Nutr. Rev. 1997; 55(2): 3143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21Cole, TJ, Bellizzi, MC, Flegal, KM, Dietz, WH. Body mass index in children worldwide: cut-off points for underweight, overweight and obesity. Br. Med. J. 2001; 320(7244): 1240–3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22World Health Organization (WHO). Physical Status: The Use and Interpretation of Anthropometry. Report of a WHO Expert Committe. WHO Technical Report Series No. 854. Geneva: WHO, 1995.Google Scholar
23STATA Corporation. STATA Version 6.0. College Station, TX. Stata Corporation, 1999.Google Scholar
24Zhai, F, Lu, B, Jin, S, Popkin, BM. Impact of maternal income on the nutrients intake of preschool children – a case study in 8 provinces of China. Wei Sheng Yan Jiu 1998; 27(4): 269–72.Google ScholarPubMed
25Doak, CM, Popkin, BM. The emerging problem of obesity in developing countries. In: Semba, R, Bloem, M, eds. Nutrition and Health in Developing Countries, Totowa, NJ: Humana Press, 447–64.Google Scholar
26Popkin, BM. The nutrition transition and its health implications in lower income countries. Public Health Nutr. 1998; 1: 521.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
27Popkin, BM, Doak, C. The obesity epidemic is a worldwide phenomenon. Nutr. Rev. 1998; 56: 106–14.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
28Popkin, BM, Bisgrove, EZ. Urbanization and nutrition in lowincome countries. Food Nutr. Bull. 1988; 10(1): 323.Google Scholar
29Chee, BWL. Eating snacks and biting pressure: only children in Beijing. In: Jing, J, ed. Feeding China's Little Emperors: Food, Children and Social Change. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000; 4870.Google Scholar
30Yuhua, G. Family relations: the generation: gap at the table. In: Jing, J, ed. Feeding China's Little Emperors: Food, Children and Social Change. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000; 94113.Google Scholar
31Watson, JL. Food as a lens: the past, present, and future of family life in China. In: Jing, J, ed. Feeding China's Little Emperors: Food, Children and Social Change. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000; 199212.Google Scholar
32Gillette, MB. Children's food and Islamic dietary restrictions in Xi'an. In: Jing, J, ed. Feeding China's Little Emperors: Food, Children and Social Change. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000; 7193.Google Scholar
33Jing, J. Food, children, and social change in contemporary China. In: Jing, J, ed. Feeding China's Little Emperors: Food, Children and Social Change. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000; 126.Google Scholar
You have Access
63
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The underweight/overweight household: an exploration of household sociodemographic and dietary factors in China
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The underweight/overweight household: an exploration of household sociodemographic and dietary factors in China
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The underweight/overweight household: an exploration of household sociodemographic and dietary factors in China
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *