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Collision analysis and safety evaluation using a collision model for the frontal robot–human impact

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2014

Jung-Jun Park
Affiliation:
Manufacturing Center, Samsung Electronics, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Jae-Bok Song*
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Sami Haddadin
Affiliation:
Institute of Automatic Control, Leibniz University Hanover (LUH), Germany
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: jbsong@korea.ac.kr

Summary

The safety analysis of human–robot collisions has recently drawn significant attention, as robots are increasingly used in human environments. In order to understand the potential injury a robot could cause in case of an impact, such incidents should be evaluated before designing a robot arm based on biomechanical safety criteria. In recent literature, such incidents have been investigated mostly by experimental crash-testing. However, experimental methods are expensive, and the design parameters of the robot arm are difficult to change instantly. In order to solve this issue, we propose a novel robot-human collision model consisting of a 6-degree-of-freedom mass-spring-damper system for impact analysis. Since the proposed robot-human consists of a head, neck, chest, and torso, the relative motion among these body parts can be analyzed. In this study, collision analysis of impacts to the head, neck, and chest at various collision speeds are conducted using the proposed collision model. Then, the degree of injury is estimated by using various biomechanical severity indices. The reliability of the proposed collision model is verified by comparing the obtained simulation results with experimental results from literature. Furthermore, the basic requirements for the design of safer robots are determined.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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