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Motion planning and posture control of multiple n-link doubly nonholonomic manipulators

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2015

Bibhya Sharma*
Affiliation:
The University of the South Pacific, FIJI
Jito Vanualailai
Affiliation:
The University of the South Pacific, FIJI
Shonal Singh
Affiliation:
The University of the South Pacific, FIJI
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: sharma_b@usp.ac.fj
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The paper considers the problem of motion planning and posture control of multiple n-link doubly nonholonomic mobile manipulators in an obstacle-cluttered and bounded workspace. The workspace is constrained with the existence of an arbitrary number of fixed obstacles (disks, rods and curves), artificial obstacles and moving obstacles. The coordination of multiple n-link doubly nonholonomic mobile manipulators subjected to such constraints becomes therefore a challenging navigational and steering problem that few papers have considered in the past. Our approach to developing the controllers, which are novel decentralized nonlinear acceleration controllers, is based on a Lyapunov control scheme that is not only intuitively understandable but also allows simple but rigorous development of the controllers. Via the scheme, we showed that the avoidance of all types of obstacles was possible, that the manipulators could reach a neighborhood of their goal and that their final orientation approximated the desired orientation. Computer simulations illustrate these results.

Type
Articles
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015

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