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Accumulative fusion and the issue of age: Reconciling the model with the data

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 December 2018

Cheskie Rosenzweig
Affiliation:
Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027. cr2769@tc.columbia.edu
Benjamin C. Ruisch
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. bcr44@cornell.edu
Chadly Stern
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61820. chadly@illinois.eduwww.psychology.illinois.edu/people/chadly

Abstract

We discuss a disconnect between the predictions of Whitehouse's model regarding the accumulative nature of fusion and real-world data regarding the age at which people generally engage in self-sacrifice. We argue that incorporating the link between age and identity development into Whitehouse's theoretical framework is central to understanding when and why people engage in self-sacrifice on behalf of the group.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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