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Clinical applications of counterfactual thinking during memory reactivation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2015

Felipe De Brigard
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708. felipe.debrigard@duke.eduwww.felipedebrigard.com Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708. eleanor.hanna@duke.edu Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708.
Eleanor Hanna
Affiliation:
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708. eleanor.hanna@duke.edu Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708.

Abstract

The Integrative Memory Model offers a strong foundation upon which to build successful strategies for clinical intervention. The next challenge is to figure out which cognitive strategies are more likely to bring about successful and beneficial modifications of reactivated memories during therapy. In this commentary we suggest that exercising emotional regulation during episodic counterfactual thinking is likely to be a successful therapeutic strategy to bring about beneficial memory modifications.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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References

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