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The complex nature of willpower and conceptual mapping of its normative significance in research on stress, addiction, and dementia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2021

Veljko Dubljević
Affiliation:
Departments of Philosophy and Religious Studiesveljko_dubljevic@ncsu.edu; https://sites.google.com/view/neuroethics-group/home
Shevaun D. Neupert
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC27695. shevaun_neupert@ncsu.edu; https://sites.google.com/a/ncsu.edu/wellbeinglab/

Abstract

Willpower (as suppression, resolve, and habit) has ramifications for autonomy and mental time-travel. Autonomy presupposes mature powers of volition and the capacity to anticipate future events and consequences of one's actions. Ainslie's study is useful to clarify basic autonomy in addiction and dementia. Furthermore, we show how our study on coping with stress can be applied to suppression and resolve.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

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