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Cooperation and fairness depend on self-regulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2013

Sarah E. Ainsworth
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4301. ainsworth@psy.fsu.eduhttp://www.psy.fsu.edu/~baumeistertice/ainsworth.htmlbaumeister@psy.fsu.eduhttp://www.psy.fsu.edu/~baumeistertice/index.html
Roy F. Baumeister
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4301. ainsworth@psy.fsu.eduhttp://www.psy.fsu.edu/~baumeistertice/ainsworth.htmlbaumeister@psy.fsu.eduhttp://www.psy.fsu.edu/~baumeistertice/index.html
Corresponding

Abstract

Any evolved disposition for fairness and cooperation would not replace but merely compete with selfish and other antisocial impulses. Therefore, we propose that human cooperation and fairness depend on self-regulation. Evidence shows reductions in fairness and other prosocial tendencies when self-regulation fails.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013

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References

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