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Evolutionary explanations for financial and prosocial biases: Beyond mating motivation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 March 2017


Anthony C. Little
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY United Kingdom a.little@bath.ac.uk dranthonylittle@gmail.com http://www.alittlelab.com
Corresponding

Abstract

Mating motivation likely plays a role in bias to attractive individuals, but there are other complementary theories drawn from the evolutionary literature related to competition, friendship, and leadership selection that also make relevant predictions concerning biases towards attractive individuals. The relative balance of these factors will be context dependent and so help explain why the pattern of bias is sometimes variable.


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Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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